Why State-Based Advocacy Orgazations are Important — Two Lessons from Massachuetts


Originally posted on Richard Zorza's Access to Justice Blog:

Those of us who try to focus attention on the “access” side of access to justice are often criticized for not planning enough for impact advocacy side.  Two recent developments highlight the importance and potential results of having institutions that focus on legal change and also raise the question why we can not have such institutions in every state.

The Massachusetts Law Reform Institute (MLRI), where I worked during law school and briefly afterwards, is with very good reason regarded as one of the best so-called “state back-up centers” funded, till the Gingrich era, by LSC.

A few weeks ago Ernest (Tony) Winsor, the Deputy Director at MLRI for 30 years, died.  An article (not an obituary) in the Boston Globe highlights his career and contributions.  Tony was one of my supervisors as a law student, and I learned so much from him.  As the Globe put it:

One of…

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Lawyer and justice architect wannabe... I am the pro bono director for Georgia Legal Services Program and direct a program that is funded by GLSP and the State Bar of Georgia. I am a lawyer licensed to practice law in the state of Georgia, and not in any other jurisdiction. Nothing posted on this blog should be considered legal advice. Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship with me. I do not have an active legal practice and do not have clients. I am not using this site to market to clients. I do not recommend attorneys or law firms. If I reference an attorney or a law firm in this blog, I do so to tell a story, make a point, or urge you to think about an issue presented by that attorney or law firm.
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